Goins, Writer

On Writing, Ideas, and Making a Difference

Six Easy Ways to Get More Comments on Your Blog Now

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Someone asked on a recent post about blog comments (my paraphrase):

“I’ve been blogging for six months and still haven’t received a single comment. What am I doing wrong?”

Have you ever felt this way before? It can be frustrating. Especially since comments are currency to most bloggers.

How to Get More Blog Comments

Photo credit: Flickr (Creative Commons)

But before we jump into how to get your first or five hundredth comment, answer this question:

Who Are You Blogging for?

Some bloggers blog for themselves. I used to do this a lot. As a writer, I find the writing process to be cathartic. But like any good communicator, I also enjoy an audience.

For the longest time, I blogged without getting any comments. I knew people were visiting the site, but I didn’t know why they weren’t leaving a comment.

I wanted feedback.

I wanted to know what people thought about my content.

Eventually, I learned that if I wanted to get responses to my blog posts that I was going to have to shift my focus. I was going to have to write first for other people. I was going to have to add value. And you will, too, if you want to maximize your potential for blog responses.

Once you’ve done that, you’re ready to start earning people’s comments.

How to Get More Comments

Here are some tips to get you started:

1. Write worthy content

This is easier than it sounds. Ask yourself, “If I read this, would I leave a comment? Does it demand a response?”

If your post is just a brain dump or a rant that isn’t relevant to others, it may not get much of a response. You don’t have to be a professional writer or grammatically flawless to get a comment.

If your post is well-thought and easy to understand, people will respond.

2. Hit a nerve

It doesn’t hurt to be a little controversial. Choose a topic. Pick a side. And stake your claim.

Begin a conversation in which you share your position and invite others to disagree. Be careful of overdoing this, though, as being contentious all the time can get weary. It can look like you’re just trying to pick a fight.

When in doubt, find a commonly-observed rule and break it. This is often a great way to create a new niche or find new readers. People follow courage.

3. Get out of your shell

Comment on at least 10 other blogs that are like yours and already have an audience.

Leave a thoughtful comment with your blog URL in the comments section. Don’t ask the readers to visit your blog. Just interact and give them a way to find you. If you add to the discussion, people will come find you.

4. Publish unfinished content

One of your problems may be that you’re not leaving any room for discussion. Try publishing more open-ended posts. Share an idea, but don’t think through the whole concept. Don’t finish your thought. Just throw it out there.

This is the magic of blogging — you can share something and ask for help to develop it. Nobody wants to participate in a conversation that doesn’t value varying opinions.

Whether it’s a list of favorite books or an argument that isn’t fully formed, you can invite your audience to become a part of the discussion.

5. Ask a question

This can become rote or cliche, so don’t overdo it, but it’s also the easiest way to get a comment. Leave a relevant, easy-to-answer question at the end of each post.

Sometimes, you have to lead your readers to a discussion. In fact, I’ll do this at the end of this post.

6. Make it easy

Having complicated equations and CAPTCHAs to keep out spammers can create unnecessary hurdles for your would-be commenters. Make it as easy as possible for them to leave a comment. In fact, find a way to reward them.

What do you think?

Of course, you don’t have to make this shift from writing for self to writing for others. It’s perfectly acceptable to write just to write. Just don’t complain when nobody comments.

Once you start getting more comments, be careful. They can be addictive. There’s something to be said about writing the things worth writing, but it helps to be aware of what your audience wants, too.

It’s all about balance.

For more on this subject, you can read about the scientific ways to get more blog comments on Copyblogger.

What tips for getting more comments would you add to this list? Leave a comment to join the discussion.

Did you like this post? Feel free to share it using one of the buttons below or try the new “send” button up top to recommend it to a friend on Facebook!

*Photo credit: stefg74

About Jeff Goins

I help people tell better stories and make a difference in the world. My family and I live outside of Nashville, TN. Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, or Google Plus. Check out my new book, The In-Between. To get exclusive updates and free stuff, join my newsletter.

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  • http://www.warriorshepherd.com/blog Dave Hearn

    Great ideas Jeff!  I usually end with a question, but I think I need more controversy in my blog… :^)

    On my blog today, I include a challenge to readers, so I hope they will accept my challenge and report back in the comments section… another good option for encouraging feedback and involvement.  

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Thanks, Dave!

  • http://davidsantistevan.com David Santistevan

     I think you nailed this Jeff. Focusing on the reader rather than your own personal mind dump is huge. Another thing I would add is to do a lot of research. Become a student of your niche. What are the topics that people enjoying talking about or have questions about? Write for that and you’ll see people engage.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Agreed!

  • http://www.FirepoleMarketing.com Danny Iny

     Hey Jeff, I think the most important point (other than having readers at all) is to give people a specific call to action at the end of the post – I try to add a question, something to get them to engage, and get them started with a comment. :)

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

       Thanks, Danny. Good call. People want to know what they’re supposed to DO.

  • http://felicitywhite.com Felicity White

    Yes, I’ve found one of my big mistakes is writing in an essay style that wraps up neatly at the end. It really leaves my readers no choice but to say, “good job” or some other pat on the back. I’m learning to leave some posts a bit more open ended, but I’m also hesitant to just tack on a question at the end. I see many bloggers who do this ineffectively because it feels forced. As you say, balance.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

       You’re right. It can’t be contrived. In fact, really great content doesn’t need an explicit question. It raises it implicitly through intrigue provocation. I am still learning how to do this.

  • Linnette Mullin

     Making posts overly long can handicap you, too. Most people won’t stick around for the entire post. Just not enough time in the day.

    • http://popparables.com Keri

      Michael Perkins also mentioned brevity.  What do you define as “overly long”?  Is there a specific word count that you think is good? 

      • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

        I typically try to hit at least 300 words for search engine reasons and 700 is on the longer side. I have published some essays that are over 1000 on this blog, but typically the sweet spot is 500-600 words, if I can do it.

        If it gets longer than that, using subheads to break up the content into readable chunks is essential. In fact, breaking up your content is more important than the length of it.

        Most people will scan it, whether it’s 300 or 3000 words.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

       Right, Linnette. There is actually some debate circling the web about this right now — the readability of long-form vs. short-form and what gets lost when you stay under the 1000-word limit. I am, for the most part, on your side, though. I’ll stick around for 700, maybe 800 words, but rarely for 1500-3000. Even news articles lose my interest after the first page.

  • http://www.uptoknowgood.com Sara

    Thanks for showing and telling, Jeff. Great content and tips. Many thanks! 

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

       Thanks, Sara! I appreciate the encouragement.

  • http://www.tillhecomes.org Jeremy Myers

     Great post! The commenting on other blogs that are like yours is definitely key. It may be one of the main ways that others bloggers find you. I think most of the people I subscribe to in my Google Reader are those who have commented on my blog.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

       Awesome. You do a great job at that, as well — better than me, for sure. I’m glad we found each other, Jeremy. Loved your post on Problogger on that topic of reading others’ blogs. I love how those who are the most selfless get the greatest reward in blogging (usually). It’s encouraging and convicting.

  • bethanyplanton

     Great tips. Thanks!

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

       You’re welcome, Bethany. Thanks for the comment!

  • http://twitter.com/katdish katdish

     I think it depends so much on what you’re trying to accomplish when you write. There are some posts (like the one I wrote today) which really don’t leave much room for conversation, and that’s okay. As long as what I wrote gives the reader something to think about, I feel like I’ve accomplished what I set out to do.

    Having said that, my commenters tend to be a chatty bunch, so it’s pretty rare that I don’t get at least a few comments.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

       You’re right, Kat. And I should warn that measuring the success of your blog solely by comments may be misguided. There are blogs that get WAY more comments than mine, because the bloggers’ intention is to strike up conversation. That’s not really my goal. I’m trying to teach and encourage people. BUT I do appreciate the comments, so I try to follow these rules the best I can — at least when I’m trying to get feedback.

  • http://www.benreed.net Ben Reed

     Great post, Jeff.  I really resonate with “Publish Unfinished Content.”  I think that’s how I’ve been able to spark discussion on my blog.  And that part of writing was tough for me at first, because I always wanted to have fully complete, thought-out posts.  But I wasn’t leaving any room for others to jump in.

    Publishing “unfinished” also allows me to “ship” more quickly and easily.  

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

       Exactly. If you were writing a book or magazine article, I’d advise against this. But blogging is a different animal. It’s about connection. Your blog content is a means to something deeper — whether it be life change or a business sale or the opportunity to connect with someone. That, after all, is what the internet is all about (remember chat rooms?).

  • http://thepastorworeplaid.blogspot.com bruce crews

     Another home run Jeff.  I am constantly learning so much from you.  You own #1!

    I am putting #3 into action right now.  Couldn’t really find a way to ad #2, unless I comment on you having red hair, which we share that blessing.  

    It’s the shift from content for me to content for others that peaks my interest right now.   Thanks for challenging me – something you could ad to #7.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

       Thanks, Bruce. Really appreciate the encouragement.

      Just to be clear: #3 can be a a challenge, a controversy, or a strong call to action. Just write something that changes someone. Stir up a little debate. We are often sharpened by friction. (Just be careful, because this is playing with fire sometimes.)

  • http://popparables.com Keri

    Publish unfinished content…you may have just helped me get past my writer’s block.  Great tips, Jeff.  Thanks! 

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      You’re welcome, Keri. Glad I could help. There’s all kinds of studies out about this particular subject, but since I was practicing my own rule, I decided to publish without citing them. Perhaps in another post. The bottom line is this: people want to converse and if they feel like the discussion is pretty much closed, they won’t participate. Really great bloggers intentionally leave OUT content so that they can begin discussion and add it in the comments later.

  • http://godhungry.org Jim Martin

     Jeff, this post is particularly helpful.  When I first began my blog (about 6 years ago), I was definitely writing for me.  I was conscious that others were reading my posts but it was definitely for me.  

    Somewhere along the way, I became more aware that I needed to be writing for others.  Yet, because I was not intentional about this, I was not consistent.

    This post is an encouragement to be very intentional about writing for others and for adding value.  Thanks.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Thanks, Jim. I did the same thing for over four years. I had to blow up and start all over again (although, I wouldn’t recommend doing that, if possible).

  • http://thewholedangthing.wordpress.com Ben Emerson

    I think these are great. But I feel like there should be a “no guarantees” clause. I asked a no brainer question on my blog and didn’t even get crickets. So that does make me want to check out the “scientific ways” post from copyblogger.

    Another great post Jeff. 

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Hmmm… Interesting, Ben. These tips are to be practiced consistently in order for them to work, so the caveat that I would offer is this: not guaranteed to work in a vacuum. However, if you do ALL of these things, over time you will see more blog comments. I truly believe that.

      Of course, I could be wrong — my audience is often surprising me. My SEO series (which I thought would add a lot of value) got very little comments. Sometimes, the content just doesn’t warrant a response, but it still adds value.

      The science post from Copyblogger is about the tried-and-true techniques of thousands of blogs to get comments — including times to post and whatnot. It’s very informative. Of course, you’re dealing with people, so there is always an element of unpredictability.

      • http://www.thenarrowwaybook.com Chris Lemig

        I agree wholeheartedly with the consistency part of it. We have to be patient, too. I just got my first legitimate comment from a complete stranger after over six months of blogging. It’s worth the wait though. Good post, Jeff…thank you!

        • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

          Yeah, it takes time and patience. Can’t force it. Well, you can, but people know… Thanks, Chris!

      • http://thewholedangthing.wordpress.com Ben Emerson

        Ahh, consistency. Right. Forgot about that one.

  • Anonymous

    Promoting your blog also helps. Post links and ask for comments on Twitter, Facebook (personal and business), tumblr, Amplify, or wherever you want. From the beginning, I also let people know in person that comments mean a lot to me. I still have a modest readership and number of comments, so I can respond to each one. I really enjoy that, actually! Thanks, Jeff.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Thanks, Claire. I like that you share with your readers the importance of comments to you personally. Making the connection personal is huge. It shows them that you’re not just looking to have your ego stroked. Btw, what’s Amplify?

      • Anonymous

         http://amplify.com/   Another place to post content and automatically share. It’s not my favorite. The interface looks simple but it’s not that easy to use. I’d be curious to know what you think of it. Thx

        • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

          cool. thanks. will check out later.

  • MichaelDPerkins

     I loved # 4.  I think that many readers want to be able to think for themselves.  Leaving room for them to comment is so clutch.  I would also say don’t write novels.  People are busy and if the post looks really long, they are less likely to comment.  Or if they do it’s gonna be one of those “Great Post” types of comments that don’t really add any value to the conversation.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Good call, Michael. Can’t be too long. You do a great job with brevity.

  • Anonymous

     Good post, Jeff. One of the most important  considerations is commenting on other blogs. We can’t expect people to make comments on our work, if we are not willing to comment on others. I mean that from an universal point of view rather than from one to one response. Recently on video coverage of an event which was close to my heart, I noticed all the comments were negatives. However, the numbers of likes outranked the thumbs down about a 1000 to 1. While it is so easy to click the ‘like’ button on move on, it is not enough. It is time we stand up, or in this context, write down our true feelings on the issues.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Well said, Lyndie. Commenting on other people’s blogs is an important way to say to others, “I care.”

  • http://facesoflions.wordpress.com/ Dave Wilson

    Good post Jeff. Very helpful.

    By the way, good looking site. This is my first time visiting.

    Do you mind my asking what blog theme you use? I’ve been going back and forth trying to decide between Genesis, Woo, Standard, etc.

    Thanks,
    Dave

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

       Thanks, Dave. I use a theme called Platform by Pagelines (Pagelines is the company, Platform the theme). I went thru a lot of them before I found one that I really liked almost straight out-of-the box.

  • http://twitter.com/mommamarketing Kate Wilber

    Love this post Jeff!  Some great advice that I will definately be taking into account when I write my next blog post! Love the point of about  remembering to ask for the comment ~ such an easy thing to do but often overlooked!
    Thanks for sharing your knowledge!

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Thanks, Kate!

  • http://www.ramblingtart.com/ Krista

    I just found your blog through Blog Rocket and really enjoyed this post! Great and effective tips. :-)

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Thanks, Krista!

  • Keith Jennings

    Jeff,

    This can be such a discouraging topic for bloggers.  Especially for those serious enough to learn more about the scientific side of content, like social proof, authority, reciprocity and cumulative advantage.  When visitors see no comments, they tend to quickly move on.

    I didn’t get consistent comments for nearly a year (felt like eternity).  What got the comments rolling for me was getting eye-to-eye with five regular readers (they would email me consistently but never comment).  I asked them to commit to leaving one comment per week.  I taught them how to leave a comment.  And I offered to proof-read their comments if they were worried they would sound dumb (which I discovered was the real problem).

    What’s funny is, today, not one of them comments on my blog (even though they all still read every post and email me).  My regular commenters today are folks I’ve never physically met.

    Hope that gives your readers some new insight.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

       Thanks, Keith.

  • http://www.thedailywalk.net Adam

    Being involved in the blogging community by leaving comments on others blogs have really helped me getting comments.  Also, ending each post with a question or call to action seems to get quiet a few responses for me.

    Great list. Enjoyed it!

  • http://www.thedailywalk.net Adam

    Being involved in the blogging community by leaving comments on others blogs have really helped me getting comments.  Also, ending each post with a question or call to action seems to get quiet a few responses for me.

    Great list. Enjoyed it!

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Thanks for sharing, Adam, and for reading the blog!

      • http://www.thedailywalk.net Adam

        You bet man. I am loving it. Glad I was able to join you community over
        here.

        • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

          It’s a pleasure to have you!

  • http://duane-Scott.net/ Duane Scott

    This is a great list Jeff, but I can honestly say, there is nothing more annoying than a blogger who consistently asks a question at the end of a post.

    A true writer will trust his voice, and trust his readers to understand the voice.

     

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      I agree with this, Duane. I’m learning how to leave implicit questions. That said, people sometimes need prompting. It’s a balance, I think. And blogging is an art form different from writing a book or magazine article or even free-writing. It needs to be treated as such (something that I’ve seen some writers struggle with.

      • http://profiles.google.com/bonnie.gray Bonnie Gray

        For my blog, closing the post with reflective questions as prompts have encouraged comments; people are shy when it comes to adding their voice.  I’ve blogged without asking questions for months when I first started.  I did develope a following, but it wasn’t until I asked questions that my friends started sharing their thoughts.  So, if someone is going for community building, then questions are a way of opening the door and inviting someone in.

        • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

          That’s a great technique.

  • Chris Donato

     Great thoughts here. I gave up on the brevity thing (never tried it really), and thus I think I gave up comments . . .

    Would love to have them, though.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      hah! hmmm…

      • Chris Donato

        You know, it occurs to me that #4 is very hard to do.

        From the professional world I’ve called home for the past decade, this practice could have way too many negative consequences. I’m now somewhat removed from that specter, but the principle (not pressing “publish” when a thought is unfinished and thus potentially half-baked and sloppy) is still very much with me.

        • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

          Hmmm… yes, I can see that. This is just a completely different medium, but there’s a lot to be said for excellence. Just don’t let it prohibit you from shipping today. For me, that’s what it comes down to — I am going to try my hardest to make this the very best I can… TODAY. And then tomorrow, I’ll start all over again.

          • http://twitter.com/StuartWooster Stuart Wooster

            I like that thought process. Top tip to stop people stalling.

            • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

              thanks, stuart.

  • Alan Knox

    I think the two most important tips are #4 (publish unfinished content) and #5 (ask a question). Asking your readers’ for their opinion is very important. Then, I would add one more: Respond to the comments that you get! If you engage your readers in conversation and interact with their opinions, then they will be more likely to comment next time, and others will see that you value their input.

    -Alan

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Thanks, Alan. I agree with everything you just said.

  • http://www.indiebusinessblog.com Donna Maria Coles Johnson

     Ooooh! Love suggestion #4. I don’t think I have ever published an article I would consider “unfinished.” Why not? Seems like such an obvious idea. Thanks for sharing. I’m going to try this.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Thanks Donna!

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Let me know how it goes, Donna!

  • Pingback: my blogging story: how it began | duane scott

  • Deana Barnhart

    Visiting others blogs really helps, plus you meet some amazing people while you’re at it! 

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Agreed, Deanna.

  • Myrah – Coupon Mamacita

    Jeff, very good post with GREAT TIPS!  For me, leaving comments in other blogs  was the boost I needed to get started!

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      thanks, myrah!

  • http://www.shyjumathew.com Shyju Mathew

    Dear Jeff, I recently stumbled on your blog & it’s been captivating & encouraging me to write & blog better. Thank u for adding value! Shy.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Thanks, Shy!

  • http://stay-at-home-work-online.blogspot.com/ LisaAuch

    I was fortunate to have a good network of online associates, it took me 2 and a bit years to gain respect, following, establish myself as someone who would help….After recieving email after email…asking how do I….? i find many people ask the same questions, usually when starting out,  I whipped up a blog, and every time I receive an email, I answer via my blog.
    I was surprised to find comments and followers, on the first post!  I do need to cut down on useless, words…this is how I found you via 5 weak words…this is my project, but hey I love to talk!

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Thanks for the comment, Lisa. Sounds like you have a good thing going for you!

  • http://www.bukville.com/ Buky of Bukville

    These are great tips especially #4. I have a lot of unfinished post, i get bug down trying too hard and you have just set me right. 

    I am going to post my unfinished post and ask for their suggestions.

    Thanks again!

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Good luck!

  • clateboulder

    Very well thought out original points. Every blogger and writer should put them in practice.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Thanks for the comment.

  • Pingback: Tips On Getting More Blog Comments | This Is Me Thinking

  • Chauncey Zalkin

    honestly, i just followed a twitter link here and have gotten the most value out of any random blog discovery than ever before. i loved your ‘just ask’ advice in another post. oh and to follow your advice, i’m http://www.whatwomenmake.com and http://www.showloveworld.com. happy sunday!

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      thanks!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1496062453 Peggy Herrman

    Dear Jeff, yep going to promote my blog: http://www.docpegisin.com and leave a serious question.  I’m no different than other writers/thinkers.  I too love the writing/communication process (probably more than many).  Would so love more comments.  But, my topic is one most folks avoid.  People often say: “you make me think.”  that is great.  but “what” are you thinking????  gosh I would love to hear more and spur more thinking.  thanks (a small rant).  Best, Doc Peg

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Peg, I suppose it depends on the content and style of writing. Some engagement is harder to measure. One thing you might encourage people to do is to email you, if commenting feels too vulnerable.

  • http://www.label-reussite.com Eurek@

    Je viens de découvrir  votre goinswriter …
    C’est plein de beaucoup de bonnes choses pour n’importe quel écrivain,
    débutant ou ancien.
    Merci.

  • Anonymous

    Yep yep yep. I’ve also found that interacting with readers, and “knowing” who they are really helps. Many feel like they have a relationship with me, and I should at least acknowledge that by having a bit of a relationship with them as well. Blogs are conversational. Books are monolog-tional. ;)

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Great mashup!

  • Lia London

    Number 4 flies in the face of many online writing advice-givers, and yet I agree with you.  If we’re setting ourselves up as the end-all-be-all (know-it-all), no one feels entitled to comment. But writing is a craft that people approach differently; different viewpoints and ideas are vital to the growth of all who really want to grow their writing.

    On the anti-spamming thing…. What about concerns of inappropriate spamming, porn, etc.?  I’m always appalled at how such people seem to lurk, waiting for an opportunity to infiltrate completely unrelated websites with links to yuck.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Just moderate it manually. Having a high barrier to entry will keep out well meaning commenters who won’t bother.

  • http://ratiooffailures.blogspot.com Kim

    You also have to step out of your own mind and read other blogs, and leave thoughtful comments. You have to join the community – thoughtful comments from you will gain you readers, who will also leave comments on your posts.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Agreed. It’s communal.

  • http://twitter.com/munropaservices Joanne Munro

    Really useful post but I’m still none the wiser really. I have a personal blog and a craft blog that people comment on all the time, but my productivity blog (I’m a VA) gets hardly any comments at all – despite my stats and other people telling me they read it!

    I’m pretty sure I’m following all the advice and points you’ve outlined, but maybe it’s the readership? I hardly ever comment on blogs myself and just read them to gain knowledge (I’m working my way through every post you’ve ever written!) so maybe people use mine in the same way?

    Joanne Munro
    http://www.munro-pa.co.uk/chaoskiller

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      Joanne – could be the content, too. some content is more commentable than others. you might play with other types of calls to action. for example, what if you asked for email responses?

    • Lauren Metzler

      I feel the same way Joanne! I never comment on other people’s blogs (guilty!) just use them for info. I am trying to change my ways though as of today! :D

  • Carrie Smith

    You’re writing about writing to get more comments. And I’m commenting about writing to get more comments. :)

    This post has been really helpful for me. When I first started writing (being so new) I wrote for myself and what “I thought” readers wanted. Now I write for my readers from a deeper part of myself.

    The constant revelations and thought provoking discussions I have with myself. I have found that as a writer you need to open yourself/your mind up to others, to tell a story or experience. That’s when others will comment and share as well. 

    When the post is genuine.

    • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

      this comment made my brain hurt

  • Manilaman81

    Jeff,
    You have touched on some really good information that is useful to me. I have been trying to figure out why my blog isn’t getting any comments, and the sad part its geared towards giving away free stuff. I even have a giveaway going on right now and noone is even entering.. what can I do?

  • Anonymous

    Thank you, Jeff, for sharing these tips, I’ll be sure to try them on my blog.

    Sincerely,

    Julian @ http://www.thelonelycomputer.org

  • Anonymous

    Hi Jeff!
    Thanks for the helpful article.  I need your expert advice…What do you think is the most effective “call to action” at the end of a blog post to encourage comments?  I noticed you wrote “Leave a comment to join the discussion” on this article, is that your standard?  My blog will be up shortly so I’m trying to nail down these important details.  My blog will partner with my new website, http://www.UltraContest.com.  Thank you!! 

  • Marissa Dunn

    I really liked this and thought it helpful.  I’ve read a few posts on this topic and your #4 Publish Unfinished Content was the first time I’ve read that.  I will try that in the future.

  • ubaidrehman

    Its good we can follow and get more ! 

  • http://twitter.com/Josbarrios Josué Barrios

    Great post.

  • http://thepasttenseofliving.blogspot.com/ Joseph

    Sounds like this would help. I like the idea of publishing unfinished content. 

    • Lauren Metzler

      me too! :D

  • http://www.facebook.com/tamara.delafuente3 Tamara De La Fuente

    Did not think about leaving an open-ended question to encourage comments, I’m going to try this.  Thanks.

  • Suzie

    The thing about commenting I find the most frustrating is when you have to jump through a million hoops only to have the comment not post. I’ve stopped commenting on a lot of blogs that I know require this protocol. There is definitely something to be said for simplicity! Thanks for all your other suggestions.

  • http://KatiePenryn.com/ Katiepenryn

    Finishing your post with a question is a good idea. I shall try it on my next post and maybe someone will write a comment on my virgin blog. BTW up the redheads, I’m one, too.

  • Nyatellez

    “Bumped” onto this blog and found it simple, direct, and informative. I enjoyed the open style and frankness. I don’t have a blog and never thought of starting one, but when I read a well written piece, I get excited about reading the comments that are exchanged between blogger and reader. It transforms readership into an audience thoughtful enough to carry a discussion in the form of conversation.

    I felt it was very perceptive on your part to add # 4 since most would consider that to be the last thing to do, to expose and unfinished thought which traditionally is discouraged from the very beginning in elementary school essay writing. But it is really a freedom that encourages conversation.

    Mechanically, I hate commenting and facing many technical barriers to submit the comment. Making simple to post encourages the conversation.

    Thank you for your thoroughness.

  • Abhijeet

    thank you

  • joshlancette

    Hi Jeff,
    Thanks for the tips.
    How were you able to create the link (Leave a comment to join the discussion) that takes us right to the comments section? I am using Disqus as well, and have had a difficult time figuring it out.
    Thanks,
    Josh

  • Ashley

    Thanks Jeff, Sounds like this would help. I will try and see what will come.

  • Zavina

    Thank you so much for the advice!

    http://thezealousfashionlife.blogspot.co.uk/

  • The Observer

    Thanks for your advice. I was struggling to gain comments for my blog and was wondering where I should start with that. This help me understand the steps to generate comments! Thanks :3

    http://shinecero.blogspot.com/p/home-page.html

  • Graham Maddison

    I have a new website about cervical spondylosis and our (my wife and I) personal evaluations when trying various “Alternative Therapies” for pain management.

    On every page we leave a footnote – please feel free to comment. We genuinely are seeking comments from others who have experienced these therapies, which can only serve to help our readers .
    As yet, not a single comment! ..admittedly, our traffic is small at the moment, but it would be nice to start seeing comments.
    Your article has given me some Ideas and i thank you for that.

    Graham Maddison http://myneck.net

  • Jason Lilly

    I needed some tips for my blog and you were the first man I googled for help. Thank you for these. They are very helpful. You are the man. I have a target audience, and my hope is that as I post more regularly more of them will come forward and join in the discussion. I write a lot about faith and what that looks like in everyday life. Sometimes it’s not easy and I tackle some controversial questions.

    Here’s to hoping.

    http://wolfdreamer1112.wordpress.com

  • bestofshayari.blogspot.in

    I think asking questions at the end of post related to the topic works very well and psychologically strikes the user’s mind to write comments. I have seen this in problogger and quicksprout. They ask questions and make them italic and bold to get more user attention and the result is they are getting more than 100 comments for each post. http://www.avdhootblogger.com/2013/12/how-popular-bloggers-persuade-visitors.html

    • Singlewarehouse

      I might have to try this.

    • Lauren Metzler

      Good idea! I will have to try this! :D

  • Singlewarehouse

    Thanks for this – I’ve got a little question for you. How would you suggest a niche blog gains comments. I have a blog http://www.singleswarehouse.co.uk/warehouselife which is in a dating niche – its a hard one to gain comments in because people are scared it says “I’m lonely”.

    I’d love to hear your thoughts?

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  • Brianna

    Thank you so much for writing this. It was much more positive and hopeful for those of us newbie bloggers than some other advice posts I have seen.

    http://pearlsandpeace.blogspot.com/

  • shfiq

    hi to everyone

  • shfiq

    please comments on my blog and i will do the same.

    http://vegetablegardeningforbeginner.com/

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  • http://www.smartdunya.com/ sanwal

    Helpful Thanks for sharing…As a blogger it will really helps me a lot.

    http://www.smartdunya.com

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    very helpful………… thanks for sharing

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  • Sandy

    Loved this because it’s real. You give honest advice. Thank you.
    https://poetsandheartbreakers.blogspot.com

  • Teddy

    Great advice- will do so with my new blog: http://www.iteddythedog.weebly.com

  • Lauren Metzler

    Hello! Thank you for this post! I am struggling getting comments even after a year of blogging and writing all of the time! I’m not sure what I am doing wrong? :/

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    I think you covered the subject very well. One thing i might add, only because this is area I need to work on most, is be consistent!
    Excellent article (I thought this was worth repeating).
    http://www.puppii511.com

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