Goins, Writer

On Writing, Ideas, and Making a Difference

10 Ridiculously Simple Steps for Writing a Book

Tips for Writing a Book

The hard part of writing a book isn’t getting published. It’s the actual writing. In this article, I offer 10 steps for writing a book along with 10 bonus steps to getting your book done. Books don’t just write themselves, after all. You have to invest everything you are into creating an important piece of work.

Why the Story of the Starving Artist Needs to Die

Why the Story of the Starving Artist Needs to Die

For centuries, historians believed the great Renaissance master was just another Starving Artist, struggling to make ends meet. Michelangelo himself embraced this image, living frugally and often complaining about money. He once wrote in a poem that his art had left him “poor, old and working as a servant of others.”

But it turns out he wasn’t telling the truth.

How to Finish Writing Your Book By Abandoning It Well

How to Finish Writing Your Book By Abandoning It Well

How do you know when you’re done with a creative project? You don’t. Not really. Here’s what you need to do in order to end the process of writing a book well.

Embracing the Discipline to Write Your Book

Embracing the Discipline to Write Your Book

Whether you write for a traditional publisher or yourself as a self-publisher, the same rules of doing the work apply. You need to decide on a container for your art. These restraints will give you clarity and guidance. Mostly, they come in the form of genres and word counts.

How to Start Writing Your Book

How to Start Writing Your Book

The slowest part of the process, the beginning of writing a book, is really challenging. You have to decide on a topic, plan an outline, and create a structure. I liken it to riding a bicycle up a hill because you really have to work to gain any momentum at all. Today’s podcast is going to focus on getting started.

The Heart to Start Your Creative Journey with David Kadavy

The Heart to Start Your Creative Journey with David Kadavy

I believe David is an underrated writer and thinker. In an age of instant publication, he puts time, effort and great thought into the content and work he shares with the world. Initially, he found success with his first book, Design for Hackers.