Goins, Writer

On Writing, Ideas, and Making a Difference

3 Reasons Why You Must Become an Expert at Telling Your Own Story

What’s the first thing you do when you meet someone new? You ask him to tell you his story. But few people know how to do this well.

3 Reasons Why You Must Become an Expert at Telling Your Own Story

They give too much back story, drone on for 20 or 30 minutes, list arbitrary details that mean nothing to you, and putter out at the end, leaving you wondering what was the point. It can leave you feeling confused and unfulfilled.

This is not okay. Because you have a story to tell, and it deserves to be told well.

You need to practice. You need to become an expert at telling your own story. Consider some of the basic elements of any good story and how they apply to your story:

  • What’s the conflict?
  • Who’s the hero?
  • Where is the suspense?
  • How will the conflict resolve?
  • What’s the point?
  • Why does it matter to me?

Classic stories, myths, and fairy tales tend to happen in three acts. They raise each of the above questions and then answer them. The conflict gets worse for the protagonist before it gets better.

The movement of the hero undergoes a major complication at some point before he starts winning again. All seems lost before redemption happens. And so, you must apply these same elements to your own tale.

Why?

Here are three reasons why your becoming an expert of your own story is essential:

1. Nobody cares about your resume

For many professional fields, the resume is dead. This is especially true for creatives.

What people want to know is your story. What happens when I Google you? What does your “bio” say?

Future employers want to know: What are your life experiences, and how have they shaped you? You need to be ready to tell them.

2. Story is the new marketing

Think about the organizations you know that are really making a difference. Chances are, they’re telling a compelling story. I can think of several that immediately come to mind:

  • TOMS Shoes began with a story that Blake told and continues every time someone buys a pair of shoes.
  • Charity:Water starts with the story of a birthday party and still offers you the chance to donate your birthday to help people lacking clean drinking water.
  • Apple‘s story is about the underdog eventually beating out the competitor who wronged him. Every customer gets to live out this same story each time they buy a Mac or iPhone.

Do you see a pattern here? Influential organizations and individuals tell a story that is so compelling others can’t help but want to join it.

3. You don’t know your story as well as you think

Telling your story helps you make sense of your life — why certain events happened the way they did. You begin to examine what has happened to and through you.

You begin to make sense of who you are.

Telling your story can be incredibly therapeutic, and the practice often leads to greater confidence and understanding of self. Most people don’t take the time to do this. They take their stories for granted; they don’t steward them.

Take the time to learn your story. We need it. And we need you to tell it. If we’re going to be changed by it, you need to tell your story well.

So, how about a little exercise?

In three sentences or less, what’s your story? Make sure it has a hook, conflict, and a reflection.

Ready?

Leave a comment below to share your story, and tweet out it out using the hash tag #mystoryis.

About Jeff Goins

I write books and help writers get their work out into the world. I am the best-selling author of four books, including The Art of Work. Each week, I send out a newsletter with free tips on writing and creativity.

It’s Not Too Late to Become a Writer

Download my free eBook on why now is the best time to become a writer.

In this book, I share everything I’ve learned bout what it takes to start writing for a living — and how you can get started today.

Click here to download the free book now.

  • I am a Christian Blogger and Website Designer. I love studying the Bible and sharing it with people. I am a wife, mother and grandmother who lives in South Carolina.

  • I worked a job I hated to pay for a home I couldn’t afford. I was addicted to alcohol, quit my job and my home was foreclosed. Homeless, I lived out of my car at a truckstop for 9 months where I learned how to be grateful for all things and I rebuilt my life.
    Good exercise and tips Jeff! Thanks for posting.

    • Amazing!

    • Anonymous

      Wow! Incredible story. So happy you are back on track. 

  • I lost my mom to cancer when I was a teenager and lived in fear for years.  I settled for a marriage that was emotionally and verbally abusive and turned to alcohol to numb my bad choices.  I am thankful that after losing everything, God was waiting for me and Inow  stand in the wide open spaces of His grace and love.

    Okay, so those are 3  rather long sentences.  Will need to work on this.
    Thanks Jeff

    • That was great!

    • Anonymous

      His wide open spaces of love and grace are incredible!

  • Nathan Gilmer

    My goal is to live a great story with my life. I am a photographer and I help people tell their own stories through this art form. I am married and have a great dog and currently live in Daytona Beach Florida.

  • Nathan Gilmer

    My goal is to live a great story with my life. I am a photographer and I help people tell their own stories through this art form. I am married and have a great dog and currently live in Daytona Beach Florida.

  • This was harder to craft than I’d anticipated:

    My story is: about a girl who was lost and then found, and who finally feels whole as “Mother.” She seeks the forgotten stories of your heart.

    Great exercise!

  • A military officer who got the taste of the physical battle and couldn’t go back to his desk.  A God who showed him there is a bigger spiritual battle raging.  An army of world changers just waiting to be trained and sent.

    • Love it.

    • Warriorshepherd_blog

      This wa a fun exercise, Jeff. Thanks!

  • I was married to and had four children with a man who shared my faith for 13 years. He came to no longer believe in the same God that I believed in almost 2 years ago. I now write about living out our interfaith family life not simply out of duty or obligation, but with joy and passion.

  • I’m an ex-Baptist pastor who recently was asked to share at a group memorial service. Was given only 3-4 minutes to do so and found it a real challenge to prepare. That’s much harder than delivering a 20-30 minute sermon.

    • Thanks, Will. How did it go?

      • Went well. Had to rethink how we communicate and choose words wisely for optimum effect. No time/room for “filler.”

        • Sometimes that’s good. Right to the point.

  • Raised by a single FBI agent mother.
    Grew up to become a published poet.
    Still trying to figure out what I am
    besides painfully independent.

  • Jamie

    Disappointed and broken, I felt defined by the mistakes of my past. In Christ I found salvation, redemption, and new life. Now, I write to tell the greatest story of all time and invite others into the relationship that transformed my life.

  • My life was neither good nor bad when I decided to move to Nashville as a step of faith. Four days before I moved, I was offered what I thought was my dream job, affirming the risk and helping me settle into the city I now love. It’s a year later and these lessons in dependence on God have emboldened me to take another leap in an unexpected direction.

    Great exercise, Jeff!

  • I thought I knew all the answers, until I had babies. Then I realized what I had was a lot of questions, about love and life, suffering and pain, God and babies. Now I have answers, but each answer brings more questions with it, I want to have answers for my children, but I’ve realized that I learn more by living through the questions, than actually arriving at the answer.

    Wow it is actually 3 sentences…even though the last is a bit of a run on…..:) Great exercise. 

  • A bush-baby transplanted to the city, I lost myself and found a friend. I still talk too much though. And I write novels which, at their heart, are about the search for love in all its forms.
    Judy,
    South Africa

    • Amazing. I’m loving all your stories!

  • Once again, a great post Jeff!

    Here’s my story…

    For many years I was a selfish, self-absorbed and self-centered individual looking to find fulfillment in the achievement of my personal goals.

    Then, on a day I will never forget, I was made aware of God’s unique purpose and assignment for my life.

    As a result, these days, I live with the constant tension of becoming all I’ve been created to be without going back to being the person I once was.

    • Love it. You should make this your blog bio!

      • I was thinking of doing just that!

        I want to encourage you to remain consistent with giving your gift Jeff. Your “voice” and your “story” are gaining momentum! I can’t wait to see what’s next!

        • Thanks, man. Readers, take note: Edward is going places. He’s one of the most inspiring, giving people I know.

  • stephanie pridgen

    I was a fiercely independent, insecure, depressed, self-harming, anorexic young girl. I cried out to God and He rescued me, took me on a journey, and showed me not only His heart for me, but His heart for the world. Now I have the privilege of sharing His heart with university students in Ukraine and seeing their lives changed as well.

  • When God confirmed seven times I was to marry Justin at the age of eighteen, He answered my prayer to show me His will for marriage early in life. I ditched Justin after focusing on his faults, and hooking hearts in search of love became a game I played. After walking away from God and getting tangled in a dangerous relationship, God used my mom to read a children’s book to me to begin the most gentle healing and all-around restoration ever.

    • Thanks. What was the book?

      • Ya, know, I don’t know. I tried to find it when I was writing my story a few months ago, but all I remember was that it was about this kid who gave various examples and repetitively asked his mom if he did those bad things would she still love him. The mom always replied yes. Almost as cheesy as that sounds, we were both crying by the end. God can use anything, even a kiddie book, though it was preceded by prayer.

        • Wow. Thanks for being vulnerable.

        • Retrohoop

          Is  the book, “Mama Do You Love Me?”  https://www.amazon.com/Mama-Do-You-Love-Me/dp/0811821315
          We read it to our kids when they were little.

          • That looks really familiar! I am not completely sure, though. We never owned a copy of the book and it was over 10 years ago. It still brings tears to my eyes…

    • Wow. What became of Justin? Does your mum know how powerful her story-reading really was? More…must. read. MORE!

  • Came of age in post-World War II suburban America with a father who decided to build a boat—in our backyard.  The boat became a member of the family, the talk of the neighborhood, and a litmus test of moral fiber.  With eyes perpetually fixed on far horizons, I’m still attempting to chart the imprint and power of a father’s dauntless love, perseverance and imagination. 

    • Wow. I want to hear more about the boat… And the father behind it!

  • Twenty-something witha musical upbringing and a passion for create small business feels unfulfilled in corporate job. Launches blog and consulting service to help small business owners live and work in harmony with technology. Planning to escape from reality in the fall by biking down the west coast, Vancouver to L.A. 

    • Thanks, Ethan. Love the story you’re living.

  • I expected more in life – to be a star, to rise to the top, to be successful and wield power in publicly evident ways.  And I was never satisfied.  By learning what my role and part in life truly is, I’ve gained peace and an innate sense of purpose that no one can destroy…even when I’m changing diapers.

    • Thanks, Jen. This is an important lesson to growing up, I think — learning our role, which sometimes isn’t the rock star role we thought it would be. Appreciate your humility in sharing this, and really think you are a star.

      • If AIM has taught me one thing – it’s about managing my expectations.  I’m feeling like a star, but it just doesn’t look anything like what I thought it would, and that’s okay. 🙂

  • Anonymous

    Today I finally believe in the beauty God says He sees in me. There was a time, after suffering sexual abuse, rape, abandonment by my father, and more, that I didn’t believe that. I now celebrate my radiance in Him.

    • Wow. Incredible to hear where people have come from. Thanks for sharing!

    • and you have encouraged so many in your replies! that is beautiful, vibrant,

      • Anonymous

        Thanks Jackie. Thrilled God can use me to encourage others. 

  • At the age of 7 I moved to Wales from England (UK), lived in 19 different houses in total by the time I was 19 and then decided to join the Army.

    Due to no confidence in myself and listening to others, I didn’t follow my own path, got discharged from the Army and later served the Queen in a whole other way that turned my world upside down.

    5 years later I’m looking back, seeing how far I have come and planning my future on a new path.

  • I let others write my story and simply did what I was told until I tasted creativity. It was WAY more fun. Now I can’t stop making music and building community in every circle I find myself in.

    A great post gets your mind moving. This is a great post, thanks for the inspiration.

    • You’re welcome. I want to hear more about your band.

  • Abused outcast in youth that found Christ at 24.  Thrown out of ministry six years later because of a porn addiction which led to a decade facing addiction recovery, church abuse, divorce, separation from his kids, an apartment fire, remarriage, blending a family, eight miscarriages and extended unemployment (to name a few things.)  Clinging to God and trying to see how God can take those trials and turn them to gold to help others.

    • Love your commitment to seeing your pain used to bless others, Jason. I’m so sorry you went thru all that; your faith inspires me.

  • Brannonjmarshall

    I tried to run. He told me I was blind. I’ve been trying listen ever since.

  • Brannon Marshall

    I starting running.  He told me I was blind.  I’ve been trying to listen every since

    • Brannon Marshall

      would help if I could type 🙂  “starting” = “started”
       

  • Great post, Jeff.  Let’s see…

    Kid from broken home finds healing in Christ.  Feels called to pastor others but is kept in waiting until God’s timing is right.  Lives out his days in the meantime preparing for what will one day be his dream come true.

    • Excited for when this day comes and for all the waiting. There is great fruit in the in-between.

  • The Christian “checklist” enslaved me from my childhood.

    I was told it will keep me filled, but it only left me empty and searching. 

    I finally found out who Christ really was and now I bask in the freedom He has given me and my family as we serve Him in the Amazon of Brazil, sharing this same freedom with Indians in the jungle.

  • I read this post yesterday and tried to really think of my story in terms of three sentences.  This afternoon while doing some other writing it came to me.  And I am challenged and loving it all at once.

    A wounded and broken girl who chose to please others instead of pleasing Him (and herself). Began a journey to discovering her inner creative and was filled with hope.  Now learning what true freedom looks like as she seeks to turn the page and begin a new chapter of her story.

  • Stewart

    I’m a little late to the party. Sorry, new reader. Love the blog and exercise.

    I grew up in upper middle class America with a great mom and dad, sister, two dogs and all sorts of friends from church. God saved me from a life of self absorbed comfort-seeking by sending me to Thailand with the help of Homer Simpson. I still fight the urge to seek my comfort over God’s kingdom.

  • Sandra ChristianHeretic

    I am a mystic, firstborn of a fundamentalist preacher’s
    family. To survive, I denied the mystic knowledge and I learned to play
    “holier-than-thou” so well that I kept playing the game even after I left
    religion.  Finally I realized that, for
    all my righteous deeds, whether as a Christian or a crunchy granola mom or an
    alternative health and education guru, I was still losing the game as long as I
    denied the mystic communion my soul remembered.

    • Hah! “Crunchy granola mom…” love it!

  • Nurse, desire to promote health and Hope, serving God anywhere. 
    Married my best friend 24 years 11 months ago and been all over the world including 6 years in Nigeria with orphans.
    Adopted by a heavenly Father so adopted 2 high risk white look , like me and my other 2 kids.  
    Seen God do more than I bet 99% of the world, living a hard, risky life of faith, and I am not done at 45!
    Can’t do it in three sentences!  
    but one=
    Jesus is everything to me. 
    or 
    7 words I want said of me
    free, honest, generous, faithful, passionate, content, servant

  • Nurse, desire to promote health and Hope, serving God anywhere. 
    Married my best friend 24 years 11 months ago and been all over the world including 6 years in Nigeria with orphans.
    Adopted by a heavenly Father so adopted 2 high risk white look , like me and my other 2 kids.  
    Seen God do more than I bet 99% of the world, living a hard, risky life of faith, and I am not done at 45!
    Can’t do it in three sentences!  
    but one=
    Jesus is everything to me. 
    or 
    7 words I want said of me
    free, honest, generous, faithful, passionate, content, servant

  • I gave my life to the Lord Jesus Christ at age 4 and have spent the years learning that because it’s HIS life not mine, Jesus will do with it whatever HE pleases, which is often far from my expectations but brings far better results.

    How’s that for a life story in 1 sentence?

  • Pingback: What’s Your Story? « Jesse Medina()

  • Heather Kudla

    Coming from a sheltered home-life, I succumbed silently to cruel bullying in school.  After finding Christ in college, terrible depression enslaved me using my poor choices and relationships.  Ready to die, God stopped me, setting my feet on the path of freedom, teaching me transparency and dependance on Him, giving me an impossible joy.

    • Amazing. I truly am astounded by the remarkable stories that you all have been sharing! Thanks for your courage, Heather.

      • Heather Kudla

        Thank you for this exercise.  I have been telling my story on my blog – really chronicling this journey to freedom – the last 3 years or so, but never had to put it so concisely.  It really made me think, and you should see all the scribbling in my journal I did to get it down to this!  🙂  It’s hard to see it as courage – but I guess it is… because it has taken a lot of guts to believe God no matter what, and take the next step even when I couldn’t see where I was stepping.  Thank you!

  • Lived content in religious legalism. Learned though trial and difficulty that God is love. Starting surrendering to his love through confessions of what once was. Fixing a broken arm or leg on the side.

  • There are so many different stories I could tell. This is the most current.

    A SAHM mom of 2 little ones, I chafed as I thought about children dying of hunger and sleeping in the cold as I poured out love and care to my children. I learned to be content however with the vocation and ministry that God had given me in that moment, my family, and faithful to do it well. Fast forward 5 years and I am a founding member and senior officer of a non-profit called The Charis Project that is working to establish a self-sustaining model of orphan care that not only provides for children at risk but transforms the communities they come from as well.

    • Fascinating. Thanks for sharing! Would love to hear more about your NPO. How can we find out more?

      • Well I’d be happy to oblige Jeff. 🙂

        You can check out our website at thecharisproject.org or read the whole
        story here https://shelaughsatthedays.blogspot.com/p/charis-project.html

        • Please share more in the comments – at least a link. Feel free to email me, as well (click the mail button up top).

          • Ok. Well it started in 2008 with my BIL in Thailand. He met a guy named Chala who used be be part of the Shan state army in Burma resisting the Burmese soldiers when they attacked hill tribe villages. He had gotten to Thailand, met Jesus, gone to bible school and become a pastor. He was also taking care of 40 children who were orphaned or abandoned due to the Burmese persecution of hill tribes and the poverty in Thailand. They had barely anything to eat, and yet he was the best thing that had happened to these kids since their parents were killed because he loved them. He was not the only one. There were a group of indigenous pastors taking care of orphans.

            I told my blog readers about it and they responded with donations and we set up our first orphanage with Chala as director. The problem with that however is that taking care of and rescuing these kids is not a single event. They need food every month, the economy was in a downturn and we were running out of creative ways to ask for money, not to mention the fact that though those kids were cared for their communities and countless numbers of other kids were still in need and still in trouble. We needed a way to marry aid and development.

            So we started to look for a better way to do this. We looked into agriculture as a way to provide food for the kids. They lease land to plant their own rice, they have a garden, they raise animals for food. We started to sell tribal handcrafts, such as hand woven bags as another way to generate income for the homes. We bought them a truck for safe transport for the kids to school and they went and turned it into a profitable income by offering transport services when the children don’t need it. In 2 years we’ve gotten down to only half of the homes operating costs coming form fundraising. The rest is generated by business. We’ve made  a down payment on land to build a permanent home on and a small bio intensive farm. We have two more projects in neighboring villages that we will be supporting by the end of 2011, we hope.

            The long term goal is for the homes to sustain themselves through socially responsible businesses that employ the surrounding community in agriculture, hand craft production, clean utilities such as solar power and clean water for the surrounding community, microfinance, and entrepreneurial education. We’re building a team to that end. Our vision is to take the throwaway children of the world, saturate them in the love of god and a family setting and provide them tools to be the economic and social leaders of tomorrow.

            And now I’ve written an essay in your comment box, I hope that’s ok. Our website is thecharisproject.org for the full story on my blog go here. https://shelaughsatthedays.blog

            • Awesome! Totally fine (I asked, didn’t I?). Thanks for sharing.

  • Beck Gambill

    As a member of a gypsy wanna be family I grew up with a homeless heart. My mistakes, obsessions, yearnings reflected constant searching; longing for home. Overflowing grace, heaven’s Heart has swallowed those longings and my heart has found it’s home in Him.

    • Wow. Simply incredible. Thanks, Beck!

  • Anonymous

    I started a spiritual path of isolation and learning 35 years ago.  For years, life felt like it was trying to break me on a regular basis, yet, giving me tools at the same time.  Meeting both my light and shadow, initiated by Gaia into the energetic and spiritual realms, I’ve learned to allowing everything to be absorbed by Love, and let the Divine whisper my next step to my Heart in a path of service to Love.

    • Anonymous

      Oops, sorry about the extra pic.  I’m new to the disqus comment system.  Feel free to delete the file attachment and this reply.

    • Thanks for sharing.

  • I have been thinking about this a lot lately. I want to be more concise. Thanks for posting!

    • Give it a shot, Brandy! What’s your story?

  • Anonymous

    Challenging childhood, adolescence, young adulthood.

    Lost everything, found inner strong woman, learned to rescue self.

    Embraced creative soul, found happiness (and life partner).

    • There’s a poetic flow to this that I really like. Thanks for sharing.

  • After I nearly lost my leg and my life in an accident, I recovered better than expected, surprising doctors who thought I might never walk again. Three months post-accident, I walked and four years later, I returned to running.

    It sounds like a courageous happy-ever-after story, but for a time, it was far from that. Learning to live with pain, loss, and a leg with a stark deformity threw everything I thought I knew about God, life and myself into a whirlwind that I dubbed Hurricane Reality. I’m slowly finding hope … one step at a time.

    • Thanks for sharing, Janet. Love how you’re persevering.

  • Anonymous

    Doing a link-share on my blog this week. Asking my reader to share a link to their favorite blog post that they wrote or read. I couldn’t wait to share this post! LOVE IT!!! Thanks for your inspiration.

  • Dying inside while living the cubicle life in Corporate America. Took a step into the waters of adventure and unpredictability. Fulfilling my dream as a film producer.

    • Allison Rivers

      So inspiring!! There is hope for the vocationally mismatched and trapped after all!

    • awesome, russ.

  • Pingback: Telling My Story » Cat Pollock()

  • Debidoo1979

    After the shooting I didn’t want to teach anymore. Then I learned not to be a victim any longer. Because I survived, I am a better teacher and have much more to teach.

  • I am reading this late but I have learnt a lot from this blog and the comments. thanks for sharing all the inspiring stories. Now, let me give it a try:

    Buffetted by many storms with my health, I know I can not afford to give up hope. I trust God each day for the strength to hold on, go through each storm and come out victorious. I share my story to encourage and inspire hope in others.

  • Amy

    Grew up in fear of my father, picked on and feeling unwanted at home I turned to a teacher I adored and was molested, married my high school sweetheart sent by my heavenly Father to rescue me!

    My goal to have children and let them know they are loved; I didn’t think it could be that hard.

    My children know our love for them but I still could not accept it, my walls were invisible to me until I fell on my knees asking God to change me so that I could be sure my prayers were heard for my best-friend-like-a-brother also sent by God to rescue me in a new way.

  • Jory Piccinino

    I wanted to share with the world the knowledge I gleaned through living with a madman, my misguided father, who told us we were worthless when we’re all just doing our personal best. At first I thought I was a victim, because it felt I was being attacked from every direction, including misfiring brain chemicals from within. But because I knew I was stronger than this, I had to surrender to the force that propelled me literally to run away and find a new life, a life where miracles happen all the time.

  • Janetta

    You would never know to look at me now, what happened to me in 1999 ? After being diagnosed with kidney failure, I realized in the final analysis although I had a personal
    relationship with the lord Jesus Christ, He was my only hope for healing or deliverance and I trusted that He would do it and He did.                          In November 2010 I received a miracle of a perfect match kidney after spending 5 yrs on dialysis, I never gave up ,if you saw me now you could never tellI had ever been afflicted.       Janetta

  • EP

    I understood emotional turmoil from my experience in the womb.  I spent the first thirty years of my life learning how to lie and hide all of that brokenness and pain.  Today I am learning to be honest with myself and others and learning that healing and recovery take precious time.  

  • Evansjen2010

    I was once lost, scared, guarded and hungry for love or anything that resembled affection. I stumbled through most of my life trying to make sense of a childhood riddled with a lack of guidance by a workaholic mother suffering from substance abuse and an underemployed step father with severe depression. From being on my own at the age of 18, when pancreatic cancer took my mother and divorcing a man addicted to pills, I later went on to being a cancer survivor myself at 28, giving me the permission to finally let go and live life.  

  • Susan Bachelder

    The purpose of my life has been to live through the pain and suffering that I have the strength to survive so that I can teach others. My perseverance is present to keep the focus. Now that my story is ready to be told the ones that need to learn the lessons will find me.

  • Zette Harbour

    Long ago became far away. Once upon a time is now. I choose to live happily ever after.

  • poetik justice

    Shielded from the evils of the world. When it was time to venture out, the wolf-pack quickly smelled the naivete I was offering. I became severely damaged and that’s when I learned how to become survival of the fittest.

  • Celia Setzer

    Bold is Beautiful was released yesterday,It’s an amazing book about 28 women that overcame challenges in their lives and continued to succeed in their personal lives as well as their professional lives.I am honored to be a co-author in this journey.This book is very inspirational to all women and men.It will change many lives.Get yours today,Amazon.com,order as many as you want.it is a great gift for that hard to buy person on your Christmas list.Be Bold Be you Be Beautiful.remember BOLD is BEAUTIFUL.order at Amazon.com

  • Vanessa

    My story..teaching others they can survive. I had a hit put on my life after suing a major airline. Ii have moved over 26 times. i have completed my manuscript. The case was high profile in America and covered by world press.

    This is a captivating and astounding “true story” of one young flight attendant’s courageous fight to protect her U.S. Constitutional right of religious freedom in the work place. She and her religious liberties were put on trial in Dallas Federal court and displayed on the world’s center stage throughout the media. In the end, Southwest Airlines and their “puppets” had temporarily succeeded to sweep them both under the carpet. They used over-powering collusion, corruption, greed, perjury, intimidation, threats, coercion, obstruction of justice and betrayal as their tactics. They were weaved together by the threads of a sinister and twisted plot, which was perpetrated by Southwest Airline’s C.E.O., a Federal Judge, a Senator, and others. The intended purpose of the conspiracy was to propagate unconstitutional corporate policies and silence the righteous employees by suppression and unlawful eradication of their constitutional freedoms.
    Many lives of the just were shattered and some were even lost, as the evil ones had prospered, until now when the TRUTH is FINALLY exposed!
    I have personally heard the damning and corroborating testimony from the lips of Ms. Mary McDonald, who is one of this story’s WHISTLE BLOWING JURY MEMBERS featured in this real-life thriller.
    Passengers’ “fasten your seat belts and secure your oxygen masks!” You are in for one turbulent flight of David vs. Goliath that you will never forget! Our Creator is He who wears THE ROBE OF SUPREME JUSTICE!”
    Dr. Tony Andrew Wilbeck
    Wichita, Kansas

    “I support the leading of Vanessa Alexandra McCauley that is from the Lord for her to write this book. The American court system has failed justice in this case. The truth must be told, evil must be exposed and ALL of those responsible for this travesty will be held accountable for their respective roles in “throwing” the case as well as their part in conspiring in the subsequent cover-up.”

    The Rev. Gloria Gillaspie
    Burleson, Texas

    I think it was clear up front what this book was about!! The hero was within me.

  • Natira Yates

    I’ve had health problems for a long time. I became angry and closed in from people. Through all my struggles, I’ve become stronger than ever.

  • Amanda Grace

    Thank You Jeff. That was the most useful exercise I’ve ever done on refining my story!! I’m about to write a post about it now… I’ll link back to here as reference to the exercise 🙂
    http://www.amandajgrace.wordpress.com

  • Just heard about you via The Traveling Cup Podcast and am THRILLED with all you teach on here! I am newish to the blog world but have a passion to speak…only still gaining clarity on what I’m trying to say.

    I always knew I wanted to serve God in my life, but at 25 with three kids 3 and under, marital crisis forced me to choose who I would serve: fear or faith. I chose faith and have continued to walk the roller coaster of life, learning and growing bit by bit, as a wife and mother (now of 6). Obedient faith is never easy, but the fulfillment it brings cannot be overstated.

  • estevan

    Son of an immigrant, single mother. Married to a woman who lost her family to a religious cult. Together they’re pursuing their passion for art and robotics.

  • Justin Michael Pote

    I came back from addiction. I found my passion again. I teach people ways to cook #mystoryis

  • Andrew Hollaway

    In the midst of abuse, I learned addiction. In the midst of addiction, I learned
    overcoming. In the midst of overcoming, I learned power.

  • Jennifer Jones

    The death of my mother when I was 11 derailed my life. Loosing other significant people along the way, had me running from my past & pain most of my life. Finally I’ve reached a point where I’m ready to share my story in hopes of helping others use their pain for a purpose.

    • Andrew Sillitoe

      Hi Jennifer

      Me too, I found sharing my story painful, but ended up doing at TEDx. https://lnkd.in/eXFN-NB would love to hear what you think.

      Andrew Sillitoe

  • I agree with you. Spending sometime to think back to your stories can makes a different. We would see how stupid we were when we were kids. However, telling your stories will make it adorable, It seems like we accept who we are and start to grow up. I used to think writing a blog is a waste of time but now I use it to tell my stories, and It work like magic. A lot of people share my thoughts. Now I think that creating my kem tri nam blog to tell my own stories instead of reading the others is one of my best decisions!

  • K & K

    The protected role of being a student is about to end for us. As PhD students, we’re nearing the end of the road with graduation next spring… what to do, where to go… money is tight, professor jobs are limited. We dream of being entrepreneurs and starting our own blog and business.

  • Farah

    Loved, but never cared for, I was a ‘troubled’ child. In community, through self discovery and love, I am me today. I have never been fuller, ready to give light.

  • adamjp

    I was a workaholic marketing consultant diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia with only 3 weeks to live and went to inspirational singer / speaker and world leading seniors singer in 5 short years… My full story here… https://soundcloud.com/adampricecountrymusic/adams-inspirational-story-from-3-weeks-to-live-to-inspirational-singer

  • Sheila DeMoura

    3 sentence story:

    I was brought up by people that hated each other but loved me, confused as two how such contrasts could exist in one world. I learned in the mist of this battle that life is not black and white but maybe a mix of the two. As I grow every day I am open to all the shades of grey.

  • CTKL

    Although this article was a great motivator, I’m struggling with how to tell my story in three sentences or less. I have 54 years of stories. (ex: abused and neglected as a child, panic attacks, gave birth to a preemie with special needs, started my own business, divorce brought on by spouse with bipolar disorder and pornography addiction, lost my business, single motherhood, unemployment, bad relationships, re-marriage, struggling to find my purpose.) See, lots of stories. Feeling overwhelmed.

  • Noah Bradley

    At the age of 20 I took a year off from college and hand-built my own home, doing all the work myself, with little experience and savings, and no credit. I spent the next 40 years of my life building handmade houses one-at-a-time, seeking to make the next one better than the last. My work has been featured in many publications for it’s warmth and beauty and I now share online my secrets and encourage others to discover, design, and build their own homes… https://handmadehouses.com/

  • Jennifer Lewis

    I lived the first part of my life feeling unloved and unhappy but as an adult came understanding and revelation. I am in charge of my identity. I am in charge of producing a life that matters.