Goins, Writer

On Writing, Ideas, and Making a Difference

A Call to Live the Life You’re Afraid of (Wrecked Excerpt)

My new book, Wrecked, comes out next week. If you buy it between Aug. 1 and Aug. 4, I’ll send you over $158.00 worth of free stuff. Find out more about that here. If you haven’t read this yet, below is the introduction (adapted for the blog). Feel free to share it.

Not too long ago, my wife and I attended a concert. We saw the Civil Wars play at the Ryman Auditorium, one of our favorite venues in Nashville. It was our anniversary, and we knew of no better way to spend it than seeing one of our favorite bands.

Little did I know I was going to get a crash course in sociology and the broken condition of humanity.

Do the Hard Thing

“I’m sure someone will help you.”

For every show at the Ryman, a local printer does a special run of posters that are available only the night of the concert. They usually sell out. We have an entire collection of them in our house, all from various concerts we’ve seen over the years, each represent ing a unique memory.

That particular night, we were excited about getting the print because it had the date on it — our date, the day we were married. There was just one problem: they gave away the last poster to the man standing in line in front of me.

No problem, I thought. I’ll just offer to buy it from him. He wasn’t interested. Nor were the twenty-five other people I asked. Each time, I would tell them the same sad story: it was our anniversary.

Then I would ask them, with a little manipulation, if they were sure they didn’t want to sell the print. Two dozen people later, I still had no poster. But something strange happened during each rejection. Here’s how each went down:

Me: “Hi. Can I buy that print off of you?”

Them: “Nah . . .” (They would say this looking at me like I was crazy.)

Me: “Okay, I understand. No problem. It’s just that—well, it’s our anniversary.” At this point, their eyes would get big. Their grip on the poster would loosen for a moment, and my heart would race. They would look at me with compassion and say softly, “Oh. I’m so sorry.” I would nod and wait, expectantly.

This was followed by an awkward pause in which I assumed they were trying to decide. I would look at them, and they would stare back at me. Then they’d pause, glance at their poster, and turn back to me without making eye contact to say, “Keep asking around. I’m sure someone will help you.”

That was the phrase that killed me.

Every person told me a version of this, each time with the same sincerity. I honestly believed they meant it. But the more this happened the more hopeless I grew. It seemed everyone was saying,

I’m sure someone will do the right thing. It’s just not me.

Isn’t this how life is?

We always assume someone else will come to the rescue, but it’s never us. Surely somebody will have the decency to be the hero. Right? It doesn’t work like that. Not when everyone assumes someone else will do the right thing.

I didn’t fault those people for not giving me the poster — that was their right. What was puzzling was how they struggled with their consciences before saying no. Only a few flat-out refused. Most just stood there for a moment, puzzled. They would say sorry, that they really wanted to help, and they encouraged me to not give up.

It was as if they wanted to give it to me but were afraid. That’s what frustrated me.

I wanted to say, “Yes, someone can help. You can!” But I didn’t. I kept asking around, kept getting rejected and feeling depressed the more I talked with people.

It wasn’t until the encore of the show that a young woman agreed to sell me her print. At that point, I was incredulous. We had spoken during the intermission, and she struggled like the others to give up the poster. However, she told me to see her before we left.

During the last song, I looked up a few rows, hoping to catch her eye as the band thanked the roaring audience. She finally looked down and smiled at me. I raised my eyebrows in an inaudible question, and she nodded. I couldn’t believe it; I had all but given up.

When I handed my wife the print, she was flabbergasted. In fact, she didn’t want to receive it. The gesture was too generous, too surprising. And that’s what made it beautiful.

I know we’re only talking about a poster here — nothing life changing. But at the time, it felt like a lot more than that. Maybe it was. Maybe it was a microcosm of humanity in all its grisliness and glory.

A wake-up call

I’m no different from those two dozen people I met that night. I have my own little trinkets I’d rather not give up.

I have comforts and addictions I won’t let go of. I’m more selfish than I’d like to admit, bent on my own desires and needs more than those of others. Whenever possible, I defer responsibility. I avoid what is right and protect my own interests.

If we’re honest, many of us are like this. It’s human nature to look after your own survival first, even when it’s not a matter of life and death. We can’t help it.

We keep scrambling for scraps from the table, until one of us is finally courageous enough to do what that young woman did: to obey our conscience. To stand up and do what is right.

(Note: What made this the “right” thing to do wasn’t that I deserved the poster — I didn’t. What made it it right was that she obeyed her conscience.)

All over the world, ordinary people are making brave choices like helping beggars and moving to foreign countries. They’re listening to that still, small voice whispering, “Life is not about you.”

This is the most important life change that will ever happen to you, if you let it. I’ve experienced it myself — at least in part — and it has been anything but comfortable.

It’s been ugly and hard. I’ve had to give up my rights and expectations so I could find the life I was longing for. And it looked nothing like what I expected.

The strange part? I wouldn’t trade it for the world. I couldn’t. I’ve been changed from the inside out. I’m no longer the same me. All because of a choice that defined me and continues to shape how I view the world.

Today, I challenge you to do two things:

  1. Recall a hard choice you once made. This is something that caused you to step out of your comfort zone, that allowed you to move past selfishness and embrace the fullness of life. Remember that experience and the thrill it gave you to help someone in need.
  2. Consider a sacrificial decision you’ve yet to make. Think of one you may be avoiding or procrastinating. Whatever your conscience is saying, listen to it. Be courageous, and do the hard thing.

Lastly, I want to implore you to not be one of those people saying, “I’m sure somebody will help you.” I hope you take time today to respond to that voice inside of you, prompting you to give more and get less.

I hope you realize the “somebody” we’re all deferring to (to do the right thing) is you. (You might want to tweet that.)

To download the first chapter and get on the list to be notified when the book comes out (so you don’t miss the free stuff), click here.

About Jeff Goins

I write books and help writers get their work out into the world. I am the best-selling author of four books, including The Art of Work. Each week, I send out a newsletter with free tips on writing and creativity.

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  • That’s so clear to me Jeff. Life is not all about you, but about someone, somewhere who needs your care. I can imagine how you’ve practiced this lifestyle – you’ve given so much value to your tribe. I can’t wait to grab your “wrecked” book. 

    BTW: I’ve already subscribed to receive an alert. God bless you!

    • Great!

      • Bryce Edem

        Nice one, Jeff. Beautifully crafted. And it resonates with me… and, well, all other Homo Sapiens. Probably. Can’t wait any longer for you to get me pleasurably ‘Wrecked.’

  • Jen Sagiao

    I have mixed feelings about this blog. While I agree that it’s important to help others as needed, I think there’s a point where neglecting self in favor of others is detrimental. I have spent much of my life “doing the right thing” and found myself emotionally and physically drained simply because I had pushed “me” so far away. Self-nurture is also an incredibly important skill to cultivate. The irony is, as we take care of ourselves, we also end up caring for others.

    • You’re totally right, Jen. I address this in the book, as well. There’s a section about “losing your soul to save the world.” Not healthy and not good.

    • Carrifrederick

       Jen I have been right where you are!! One thing I have learned is discernment. I felt as if I was to help anyone that ask for it, and in turn I found myself drained emotionally, physically and financially. Then one day a light bulb went off. The saying that you have to put on your own oxygen mask before you help others is exactly right. I dont think Jeff is at all saying give all of yourself but to give period. You cant give if your not healthy and taking care of yourself but at the same time you have to balance your needs and the needs of others. Keep giving but give only what you can afford to give. Keep “doing the right thing” because it is right. Dont let yourself become hardened because you helped someone and they drained you, just take a breath and learn a lesson that the ones you help will always remember that help whether you think so or not. I always keep in the back of my mind when I “help” someone, is it really going to make a difference in their life today? Can Ido this without going bankrupt (emotionally,physically or financially). If the answer is yes, DO IT. If your one of the ones that give God knows we need more of you in our world.

    • Hi Jen,

      Taking care of ourselves is definitely important. There is a big difference between giving out of guilt and giving out of love. We have to know our own boundaries and we must be able to say no to what we truly cannot do. We can’t do everything and we can’t always be the one to help others. Nobody can do that. 

      Stacy

  • Great post Jeff.  It’s so easy to get caught up in our own little worlds — business, family, playtime.  I truly live my life trying to give more than I receive, but there is always more I can do.  Thanks for the nudge to be that person. 

  • I love this excerpt! You’ve totally pulled me into your book … now I really want to read it.

    • Awesome! You can get the next chapter for free too.

  • I’ve seen it from another side.  I’ve always wanted to help people.  From the time I was 5 years old I wanted to.  There were always people in my life who needed help and I wanted to be the one to help them.  Some I couldn’t help. 

    And some I tried to help actually didn’t want my help.  The woman I saw fall down a flight of stairs and stood looking dazed?  She didn’t want my help.   

    And then there were all the people I went to, excited about ideas I had to help people.  I needed their permission in order to help people. They didn’t give it.  These are people whose ministry it was to help people and they didn’t want my help…to help people. 

    Year after year I experienced that.  Until I gave up.  I’ve lived years of longing to help people and being heart-broken at not having the opportunity.  Because no one wants my help.  The feelings of rejection have taken a toll.

    But for several years now I’ve also been in the middle of needing help myself.  I’ve been turned away by doctor after doctor.  Until yesterday.  I saw a new doctor.  I sat for an hour, telling him everything, and he said he was going to get a team of doctors together to help me.  They were going to figure this thing out.  I burst out crying.   Finally, someone was going to help me!  And more than just one someone, several someones! 

    I understand your relief, Jeff, at finally finding someone who will help you.  You’re not alone anymore.  Someone’s on your side.   The world doesn’t seem quite so hostile anymore. 

    I don’t exactly know how, but I think somehow the last several years have been preparing me to be better able to help others.  God has a plan. 

  • Great post Jeff and wonderfully written. I also read the first chapter of Wrecked and enjoyed it deeply as it resonated with the world I see. I guess I too am Wrecked. I have seen the world from another view time after time and each time I see the suffering and disappointment, and it only gets worse. I now get angry with myself when acting selfishly.

     I understand that it is our nature and it is up to us to change it. This is the message I share on my site, the message of mutual responsibility for others, as we are all part interconnected and part of a greater whole. It is not about us, you are right. It’s about everyone else. The problem with this, is even when we become “wrecked”, we still don’t want it, even if we think we do. We do whatever we can to make ourselves feel better, but it feels like a lost cause.

    Just as Beck says in his song Lost Cause, “I’m tired of fighting, fighting for a lost cause.” Most of us feel like it is a lost cause, but it’s not. Just as you described in your post about everyone leaving the chance to become the “hero” to someone else, I believe that when everyone becomes that “someone else”, the lost cause will simply be a cause. A cause worth fighting for, to make a change in the world that does make a difference.

    Thank you for being “wrecked”, together, a world wrecked is a world ready for repair. 

    Justin

  • Cheryl

    One of the challenges for me is getting to really know myself well enough to know where my motivations are coming from — it helps in getting to the bottom of what the RIGHT thing really is.  To recognize manipulation (my own, or someone else’s), guilt (appropriate or inappropriate), calling by God, peer pressure, market or cultural prodding etc requires internal work and prayer. But if I don’t take the time and make the effort to figure it out, I can wind up feeling miserable second-guessing desires, decisions, action or inaction.  I know sometimes I want to help because I like solving problems, or because I want the annoyance (or guilty feeling) of someone’s problem to go away, or because it would give me a sense of control over a situation. I don’t consider those BAD motivations — but they don’t take God or others into account and so don’t really generate an orientation to RIGHT response even if the actions are benign.  It’s then not surprising that the recipient is not necessarily happy with it either.  One of the most surprising things I’ve learned is that I can’t wait till the spur of the moment of decision to do that work — it’s too slow…

  • Jeff, I get more excited for this book with every passing day. Is it August 1 yet?

    Katie

  • Glory Gray

    Thanks for putting yourself out there on this post, Jeff. Great discussion.
          
    Don’t know that I would agree with the example, but I understand the lesson you’re trying to get across.  On the one side, how nice it would be for someone to have sold you the poster (or just given it to you) just for the joy of seeing you be happy. That’s living in the light, and I think that’s your point here.

    On the other hand, you’re chastising them for wanting an item that you clearly wanted more than anybody….and that’s manipulation. Their response to you was given because they knew there was someone else—other than them–that didn’t want the poster as bad as you wanted it.  Your task, in their mind, was to find that person.   

    From your point of view, why weren’t they that person?? Why were they making you work so hard to find that person?? 

    See what I mean?

    Any way, great discussion and your book is going to be a great success!

    • Excellent point. I wasn’t working hard; I just asked a lot of people. When they told me no, I didn’t pressure them. But several people (most actually) said they WISHED they could help me.
      They were remorseful, which was strange to me. Maybe I’m misinterpreting the situation (and thanks for understanding the overall point), but it seemed like many people felt like the right thing to do was give away the print. They just couldn’t part with it.
      I realize the example is imperfect and may come off as me looking all innocent (which wasn’t my intention). But I can relate to that feeling of not wanting to let go of something I earned, something that could help someone or make their life better.
      Maybe I should’ve used another illustration; it was just one that came to mind.
      I really do appreciate the feedback.

  • I definitely see the point you’re making here, and I admire your tenacity in working to get that print. I would for sure have given up! It’s an age-old problem – everyone assumes that the next guy down the line will do the right thing. Every day I see examples of this – a woman struggling with a baby and stroller on a crowded train, when no one will get up to give her a seat, for instance. And I wonder how many people see someone do “the right thing” and are inspired to do the same…and how many just say “whew” because they weren’t the one who had to be briefly inconvenienced.

    Still, I agree with Glory Gray – I’m not so sure that these people were struggling with their conscience. What did their conscience have to do with it? It seems to me to be more of an issue of “Who wants this more – me or him?”. Perhaps they had their own reason for wanting the print, which they didn’t see fit to share with you. Conscience implies that there’s a right and wrong for them to struggle with. 

    • Great point. Thanks for sharing. What was strange for me is almost everyone told me they wished they could help me. But they just couldn’t part with the poster. I realize it’s an arbitrary example, but I can relate to that feeling of not wanting to let go of something that someone else wants/needs.

  • Oh this really got to me. I just love the way you unfolded this story…and love that woman for following that little prompting…that still small voice.  If this is an indicator of what’s to come with Wrecked, I’m psyched. I know this may be hard to imagine as you gaze into your beautiful baby’s face, but I have found with parenting, which I’ve been doing for 32 years between my stepdaughter and three additional daughters, I have to make the decision to do the right thing sometimes. Call me selfish (I know I am, but I don’t think I’m alone), but after all these years, I have one more daughter at home and she’s a “rising senior” as they call them now. She is a wonderful gal. Of course I love her so much. However, the rewards of being totally and unqualifiedly adored are over. She’s pushing away (again, this if my fourth, you’d think I’d get used to the necessity, but pain, of separation) and I’m feeling a bit unloved, unnecessary, unimportant as related to my daughter. She’s just being normal. I know that…but it can be tempting to go off and do my own thing, spend time with people who seem to really want to be with me. It can be tempting to take all this personally. I am thankful for my conscience, my Holy Spirit compass, that when paid attention to helps me to do the right thing. To sacrifice my feelings of rejection, to extend love, grace, mercy when my selfishness rises up against this. Not as tangible as the poster, but it’s what comes to mind as I am in the thick of this.

  • Patricia W Hunter

    What a great story, Jeff.  Excellent. Really.

  • I think matters are a bit more complicated here than just willing to help people.

    1. “What was strange for me is almost everyone told me they wished they could help me” – I believe that was just a nice way of saying no. We dread confrontation and “No” is a strong word. “Wish I could help you” tries to soften the blow. The same way we say “maybe next time” when we know for sure it won’t be a next time.

    2. Unfortunately we live in a society that promotes since kindergarden “looking out for number 1” (me). Enough said.

    3. Trust. We don’t trust people who come up to us asking for something out of the blue. I blame it on abusive marketing practices. The no remorse sales guy that knows enough about persuasion techniques to take advantage of your weakness. The always on pushy adverts. The feeling you have that there is no free lunch and there is always a catch.

    4. Lies, damn lies. Way too many people simply lie to get something or to get ahead. Lie to get on welfare. Lie to get a lower price. Lie to receive a little advantage. 

    It’s funny how at the very end Jeff, even you don’t believe people can be honest. You still doubt the girl who promised to give you the poster. You still need a reassurance.

    Nice discussion but you have to go a little deeper than just “don’t be afraid”.

    • Adrian, I appreciate the comment. I don’t think it was distrust, though. It was surprise. Someone tells you no long enough, you just start to expect it.

  • You cannot help
    too many people on that. People have stopped given because of the economy and
    also because of the “TAKERS” they always hear about.
    I am not saying to give money to the man on the side of the road. I am not
    saying to give money to any individual unless you feel in your heart that you
    should. What I am saying is buy school supplies and give them out, or give them
    or money to a local charity that helps others. Give with an open hand, not a
    closed fist.

    The hardest of the hard to work with besides the children are our Veterans.
    They put their lives on the line so we have the freedom to live here. Is it a
    great country? YES. Is it perfect? NO. Many of the veterans are homeless,
    paranoid and are afraid. Some live in tents and in sheds because of things that
    happened in the war. One particular veteran I rarely see could be eligible for
    benefits but he is so afraid of the system, he chooses to hide.
    Saturday, I am celebrating my 60th birthday. I am having a party with a band
    and catering. I chose not to receive gifts for myself and ask for donations in
    any amount to a local ministry I founded to help those who fall between the
    cracks, or that are so messed up because of their families or the wars.

    I am no saint; I am one person, led by God to help others. Last year, I was
    able to give out over 15,000. in coats, clothing and hygiene items without
    spending a penny. I was in the right place at the right time and they were
    given to me. Several local churches divided them up and gave them to families
    in need.

    Sometimes I am
    so tired when I go out, I do not want to do it, but until more of the
    “someones“ show up I will. I challenge you to not only give your money, but to
    give of yourself. There is a lot that can be learned from those who seem to
    have nothing to give. I give God the glory because I am able to help others.
    Many families in America are working 2 to 3 jobs just to stay ahead. They are
    one paycheck away from the streets.

    If you want to help others, start your own program, give to an existing program
    feel free to contact me. I am not an expert but I can guide you in the right
    direction. I live in Hancock County Mississippi. I work with churches and other
    organizations. My vision is to find and open a place that serves a hot meal at
    lunch, at least five days a week. I would also like to serve the homebound who
    rarely get a hot meal. It will be open to everyone and anyone regardless of
    their “status” or “lack of status”. It is not for me to
    judge.

    Love &
    Blessings,

    jeana

    http://www.handsofhelp.com

    We are new but
    have been working with others for years. We do have non-profit status that
    allows all donations to be tax deductible. That in itself is a miracle because
    it went through the first time we applied. Think about what I wrote, pray about
    it. I am not writing just to raise funds for Hands of Help, yet if every one
    gave a little to a charity that hepls others imagine what a better place it
    would be.

     

    You cannot help
    too many people on that. People have stopped given because of the economy and
    also because of the “TAKERS” they always hear about.
    I am not saying to give money to the man on the side of the road. I am not
    saying to give money to any individual unless you feel in your heart that you
    should. What I am saying is buy school supplies and give them out, or give them
    or money to a local charity that helps others. Give with an open hand, not a
    closed fist.

    The hardest of the hard to work with besides the children are our Veterans.
    They put their lives on the line so we have the freedom to live here. Is it a
    great country? YES. Is it perfect? NO. Many of the veterans are homeless,
    paranoid and are afraid. Some live in tents and in sheds because of things that
    happened in the war. One particular veteran I rarely see could be eligible for
    benefits but he is so afraid of the system, he chooses to hide.
    Saturday, I am celebrating my 60th birthday. I am having a party with a band
    and catering. I chose not to receive gifts for myself and ask for donations in
    any amount to a local ministry I founded to help those who fall between the
    cracks, or that are so messed up because of their families or the wars.

    I am no saint; I am one person, led by God to help others. Last year, I was
    able to give out over 15,000. in coats, clothing and hygiene items without
    spending a penny. I was in the right place at the right time and they were
    given to me. Several local churches divided them up and gave them to families
    in need.

    Sometimes I am
    so tired when I go out, I do not want to do it, but until more of the
    “someones“ show up I will. I challenge you to not only give your money, but to
    give of yourself. There is a lot that can be learned from those who seem to
    have nothing to give. I give God the glory because I am able to help others.
    Many families in America are working 2 to 3 jobs just to stay ahead. They are
    one paycheck away from the streets.

    If you want to help others, start your own program, give to an existing program
    feel free to contact me. I am not an expert but I can guide you in the right
    direction. I live in Hancock County Mississippi. I work with churches and other
    organizations. My vision is to find and open a place that serves a hot meal at
    lunch, at least five days a week. I would also like to serve the homebound who
    rarely get a hot meal. It will be open to everyone and anyone regardless of
    their “status” or “lack of status”. It is not for me to
    judge.

    Love &
    Blessings,

    jeana

    http://www.handsofhelp.com

    We are new but
    have been working with others for years. We do have non-profit status that
    allows all donations to be tax deductible. That in itself is a miracle because
    it went through the first time we applied. Think about what I wrote, pray about
    it. I am not writing just to raise funds for Hands of Help, yet if every one
    gave a little to a charity that hepls others imagine what a better place it
    would be.

     

  • I am sorry for the errors below. As I stated, I am exhausted. here is the beginning. I was not able to edit.
    This is the entire article:

    I do the hard
    thing almost every day. Today I spent over 4 hours doing it. I work with low
    income and homeless people. You know, the scum of the earth that live off of
    the system and buy alcohol and cigarettes and let their children beg. Yes, that
    does happen in some cases, but not in most of them. The few that do con, steal
    and lie, make it difficult for those stretching their paycheck further than any
    of us would think possible. The mother that cries at night because she does not
    have enough food for her children. Too many people justify their tight grip on
    their billfold because the money will not be used the way they want it. Why
    should they help? Someone else can.
    I am one of the someone else’s. Unfortunately, my organization is down to under
    $100.00 in the bank. You cannot help too many people on that. People have
    stopped given because of the economy and also because of the “TAKERS”
    they always hear about.
    I am not saying to give money to the man on the side of the road. I am not
    saying to give money to any individual unless you feel in your heart that you
    should. What I am saying is buy school supplies and give them out, or give them
    or money to a local charity that helps others. Give with an open hand, not a
    closed fist.

    The hardest of
    the hard to work with besides the children are our Veterans. They put their
    lives on the line so we have the freedom to live here. Is it a great country?
    YES. Is it perfect? NO. Many of the veterans are homeless, paranoid and are
    afraid. Some live in tents and in sheds because of things that happened in the
    war. One particular veteran I rarely see could be eligible for benefits but he
    is so afraid of the system, he chooses to hide.

    Saturday, I am
    celebrating my 60th birthday. I am having a party with a band and catering. I
    chose not to receive gifts for myself and ask for donations in any amount to a
    local ministry I founded to help those who fall between the cracks, or that are
    so messed up because of their families or the wars. (The ministry is not paying
    for the party, I am)

    I am no saint; I am one person, led by God to help others. Last year, I was
    able to give out over 15,000. in coats, clothing and hygiene items without
    spending a penny. I was in the right place at the right time and they were
    given to me. Several local churches divided them up and gave them to families
    in need.

    Sometimes I am
    so tired when I go out, I do not want to do it, but until more of the
    “someones“ show up I will. I challenge you to not only give your money, but to
    give of yourself. There is a lot that can be learned from those who seem to
    have nothing to give. I give God the glory because I am able to help others.
    Many families in America are working 2 to 3 jobs just to stay ahead. They are
    one paycheck away from the streets.

    If you want to help others, start your own program, give to an existing program
    feel free to contact me. I am not an expert but I can guide you in the right
    direction. I live in Hancock County Mississippi. I work with churches and other
    organizations. My vision is to find and open a place that serves a hot meal at
    lunch, at least five days a week. I would also like to serve the homebound that
    rarely get a hot meal. It will be open to everyone and anyone regardless of
    their “status” or “lack of status”. It is not for me to
    judge.

     

     

    If you want to
    help others, start your own program, give to an existing program feel free to
    contact me. I am not an expert but I can guide you in the right direction. I
    live in Hancock County Mississippi. I work with churches and other organizations.
    My vision is to find and open a place that serves a hot meal at lunch, at least
    five days a week. I would also like to serve the homebound that rarely get a
    hot meal. It will be open to everyone and anyone regardless of their
    “status” or “lack of status”. It is not for me to judge.

    Love &
    Blessings,

    Jeana

    http://www.handsofhelp.com

    We are new but
    have been working with others for years.  We do have non-profit status that allows all
    donations to be tax deductible. That in itself is a miracle because it went
    through the first time we applied. Think about what I wrote, pray about it. I
    am not writing just to raise funds for Hands of Help, yet if everyone gave a
    little to a charity that helps others imagine what a better place it would be.

     

  • Cindy Tunstall

    Jeff, I am so excited to read the book!  I love the way you draw us into the story. 

    Your blog has blessed me so much, and I can’t wait to hear more from you.  I’m praying great blessings for you and your family! 

    ~Cindy Tunstall 

  • Tahlia Meredith

    I was hooked as soon as you introduced the concept on your blog and now, having signed up and read the intro, I’m on the edge of my seat! Look forward to the (now imminent!) release!

  • I had goosebumps while reading this! I love your writing Jeff! I can’t wait to have my own copy! It would be so lovely if it was signed! Any plans of coming down to Toronto? 

  • What is it with you Nashville peeps? A year with Nashville’s Actors’ Bridge taught me all I would need to know as I made the decision not to continue in my ‘real’ job and instead pursue writing and acting with all I have. Now here you are reminding me of all the little things I have learned since they sent me out on my journey about 12 years ago. 

    Is it something in the water? Is creativity from decades of musicians and writers wafting around in the air in that place?

    Nashvillians, or the ones that I met at least, understand that honest connection, with your own conscience and others, is the only way to go- and that is at the core of the creative urge.  I’m so glad that I got to plug into that Nashville grid for a short time a long time ago, and now I’m glad to have discovered your blog so I can visit when I need a top up. Keep up the good work and all the best of luck and love for your new book. 

  • Today I wrote in my blog about the need to push myself beyond my comfort zone, into doing those things I may not want to do, but that I need to do.  That’s when life gets interesting!

  • Great point. Thanks for sharing. What was strange for me is almost everyone told me they wished they could help me. But they just couldn’t part with the poster. I realize it’s an arbitrary example, but I can relate to that feeling of not wanting to let go of something that someone else wants/needs.

  • Today I wrote in my blog about the need to push myself beyond my comfort zone, into doing those things I may not want to do, but that I need to do.  That’s when life gets interesting!

  • We’ve been living in India for almost three years and the biggest regrets I have are the times I didn’t do more to help women I knew were being beaten. The police are no help and if I’d gotten physically involved I probably would have been beaten as well. It’s a difficult situation because the women don’t want to ask for help, that just gets them another beating later on. I try to make myself feel better by donating to and volunteering with charities that help women and children.

  • danielgrant

    I desired to say, “Yes, someone can help. You can!” But I didn’t. I kept asking around, kept getting refused and suffering from depression the more I discussed with individuals. Plus Size Clothing